Cover Art by Niki Smith.

It Takes Two: A Novel

February, 1949. Fort Myers, Florida. It started out to be such a nice day. But early morning gunfire at the Royal Plaza Motor Hotel changed all that. One white man is dead. One black man is dead. The widow of the white man has just crashed the investigation, and is waving a gun around. Barely escaping the shot that blows the window out of the car in which he is sitting is Dan Ewing, who isn't even supposed to be there. Saving his bacon is police detective Bud Wright. Bud and Dan are more than fishing buddies, but no one can know that. But their secret is just one of many in this small town. To start, Dan is the manager of the Caloosa Hotel, a class act if you're just passing through, but if you are a member of the less known Caloosa Club, Dan provides a variety of "services" club members may discreetly enjoy. This doesn't sit well with everyone in town, including the sheriff, a wealthy car dealer, the KKK, and Bud Wright, despite the fact that he's sleeping with Dan. But the car dealer is the dead white man, the black man is the husband of his wife's former maid, and the sheriff, Bud's boss, seems determined to keep the investigation off track. So what does this apparent murder suicide have to do with the Caloosa? Journalist Elliott Mackle takes his wonderfully realized "why-done-it?' mystery to fascinating levels as he explores the various factions of a small southern town facing the giant implications of a rapidly changing society.

Fiction
When drowned men's bodies begin turning up in Lee County, Florida, Detective Bud Wright and sidekick Dan Ewing must set to work solving the murders.
After eighteen terrifying monthis in Vietnam, Captain Joe Harding returns to California.
A sequel to "It Takes Two," set in Fort Myers, Florida, about two years after the conclusion of the earlier tale.
Continuing the adventures and misadventures begun in Elliott Mackle's Gaybie Award-winning "Captain Harding's Six-Day War."
Voted Best Romance in TLA's Gaybies Awards competition. . . . "Speak Its Name’s Best Book of the Year ... Resoundingly goes to 'Captain Harding’s Six Day War' by Elliott Mackle. Atmospheric, real, with great characters, politic and complicated plot all of which is left closed enough for us to be satisfied but open enough to call for a sequel which I’ve been told is being written." --Erastes, Speak Its Name.
''This is the way gay novels used to be written: big, smart, sexy, funny–with important themes, great characters, and the tainted heart of a big city at its core.'' –Felice Picano.
New Lethe Press edition of a Speak Its Name Five Star Read

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